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August 29, 2008

ALBUM OF THE MONTH

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my favorite album right now has to be LONDON ZOO by good old
Mr KEVIN MARTIN aka THE BUG.
there are too many good tracks to mention on it
so have a listen to this one for starters:

ANGRY FT TIPPA IRIE

(and now go and buy the album...)

Posted by ad at 11:47 PM | Comments (0)

COLLECTORS ITEM

great story. if we just had the money...


The Archive from Sean Dunne on Vimeo.

Posted by ad at 11:26 AM | Comments (0)

August 25, 2008

THE HYENA AND OTHER MEN

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can't praise this picture series of south african photographer
PIETER HUGO enough.
captivating and irritating at the same time.
check it out...

Posted by ad at 01:01 PM | Comments (0)

CLEARLY, THE MESSAGE IS...

LOVE!

LOL

Posted by ad at 12:06 PM | Comments (0)

August 19, 2008

SICK GIRLS PODCAST UP!

AND TO GET YOU READY FOR FRIDAY GO GET OUR
LATEST MIX AT BODYTONIC!!

download & comment...

SICK GIRLS PODCAST

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Posted by ad at 10:37 AM | Comments (0)

BEAT DIS!

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YES PEEPZ, THIS TIME WE'RE DOING IT TOGETHER WITH OUR FRIENDS
FROM DA BEATPROVIDERS. BIG TINGS ARE GWAN!
DON'T BE TOO LATE: MOTHERLAND (check'em out, young, foolish and brandnew!!) WILL PLAY AT 1.30h AND LUCA THE MAGNIFICENT AKA DROP THE LIME IS ON AT 2.00h!!

love
sg


REVOLUTION N°5 meets DRY GUILLOTINE
SCALA / FRIDAY 22.08.08 / 23h

1st
DROP THE LIME live! (trouble&bass/nyc)
MOWGLI (southern fried/ldn)
HALF GIRL/HALF SICK (sick girls, violent turd/bln)
SLY 1 (birthday party, beatproviders/bln)

2nd
MOTHERLAND live! (bln)
FEMALE MACHO (opp36/bln)
DENA FROM THE BLOCK (bln)
LIL'JEAN (bpc
JARCO WEISS (f-k-u)
EM//E (tilt)


beatproviders
drop the lime
mowgli
sick girls
motherland
female macho
dena from the block
scala berlin

MOWGLI august mix!

Posted by ad at 10:03 AM | Comments (0)

August 05, 2008

pictures

from our back to kreuzberg rumble last sat

at : NEONSLEEP

Posted by jay-oh at 03:37 PM | Comments (0)

August 04, 2008

in WW II it was native american dialects, today its OTFE

people:
in times where there is no privacy any longer, we should all turn to open source !
what remained a dystopic joke on pessimists diner parties and has long been whispered in conspiracy circles now becomes present tense. what is desired here is more paranoia, on both sides of the table, so you better run this on your notebook:

http://www.freeotfe.org/

as:
The U.S. Department of Homeland Security has concocted a remarkable new policy: It reserves the right to seize for an indefinite period of time laptops taken across the border.

A pair of DHS policies from last month say that customs agents can routinely--as a matter of course--seize, make copies of, and "analyze the information transported by any individual attempting to enter, re-enter, depart, pass through, or reside in the United States." (See policy No. 1 and No. 2.)

DHS claims the border search of electronic information is useful to detect terrorists, drug smugglers, and people violating "copyright or trademark laws." (Readers: Are you sure your iPod and laptop have absolutely no illicitly downloaded songs? You might be guilty of a felony.)

This is a disturbing new policy, and should convince anyone taking a laptop across a border to use encryption to thwart DHS snoops. Encrypt your laptop, with full disk encryption if possible, and power it down before you go through customs.

Here's a guide to customs-proofing your laptop that we published in March.

It's true that any reasonable person would probably agree that Customs agents should be able to inspect travelers' bags for contraband. But seizing a laptop and copying its hard drive is uniquely invasive--and should only be done if there's a good reason.

Sen. Russell Feingold, a Wisconsin Democrat, called the DHS policies "truly alarming" and told the Washington Post that he plans to introduce a bill that would require reasonable suspicion for border searches.

But unless Congress changes the law, DHS may be able to get away with its new rules. A U.S. federal appeals court has ruled that an in-depth analysis of a laptop's hard drive using the EnCase forensics software "was permissible without probable cause or a warrant under the border search doctrine."

At a Senate hearing in June, Larry Cunningham, a New York prosecutor who is now a law professor, defended laptop searches--but not necessarily seizures--as perfectly permissible. Preventing customs agents from searching laptops "would open a vulnerability in our border by providing criminals and terrorists with a means to smuggle child pornography or other dangerous and illegal computer files into the country," Cunningham said.

The new DHS policies say that customs agents can, "absent individualized suspicion," seize electronic gear: "Documents and electronic media, or copies thereof, may be detained for further review, either on-site at the place of detention or at an off-site location, including a location associated with a demand for assistance from an outside agency or entity."

Outside entity presumably refers to government contractors, the FBI, and National Security Agency, which can also be asked to provide "decryption assistance." Seized information will supposedly be destroyed unless customs claims there's a good reason to keep it.

An electronic device is defined as "any device capable of storing information in digital or analog form" including hard drives, compact discs, DVDs, flash drives, portable music players, cell phones, pagers, beepers, and videotapes.

Posted by jay-oh at 02:36 PM | Comments (0)